Language Learning: Warwick Conference, 2016

Paper: “Collaborative translation and language learning: a post-monolingual approach” By Chris Griffiths and Jessica Trevitt. 
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In July 2016, Chris and Jessica presented the TransCollaborate model and some initial findings at the LLAS conference Frameworks for Collaboration and Multilingualism: Languages in Higher Education, held at Warwick University (UK).

The paper emphasised the value of collaborative translation as a method for supporting language learning, and they presented initial findings from the project’s German>English case study.

Due to a last-minute change in programming, the participants were lucky enough to deliver the paper twice. Each time they received encouraging feedback, and their session chair Kate Borthwick (University of Southampton) shared her enthusiasm on Twitter.

The conference gave TransCollaborate the opportunity to tap into a valuable network of language teachers in the UK, some of whom the team look forward to seeing again at their upcoming event in Prato, Italy.

Literary context: Shakespeare and translation research

Italian Shakespeares

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Early in 2016, Prof. Angela Tiziana Tarantini (Monash University) and Chris Griffiths completed an analysis of a 1924 Italian translation of Coriolanus and Julius Caesar. Their analysis addressed how the depiction of Rome in the translation of Shakespeare was used in support of fascist ideology in the early 1920s. The translation features a critical introduction by scholar Giuseppe de Lorenzo, which outlines a intriguing argument in which the Senecan ideal that Shakespeare found in the heroes of the Plutarch and Livy is held to be synonymous with the emerging fascist ideals of the period.

Their English translation of de Lorenzo’s essay is currently under consideration and will be published in the near future.

Literary Context: Julia Min and the poetry of Su Dongpo and Li Quinzhao

Special thanks to Julia (Xiaohong) Min (Monash University), who has shared and commented on her experience of translating poems by Su Dong-po & Li Quinzhao. Her responses will be valuable in developing our research further, and we look forward to her participation the future.

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This collaborative project was undertaken with a multi-lingual, multi-disciplinary team in the 1980s. The work still fires Julia’s imagination, and she is keen to continue this type of translation project in the future.